Freeessaysample

Identify patterns and gaps in learning

Identify patterns and gaps in learning.

#136070394

Topic:

Part 4

Type of paper:

Essay (any type)

Discipline:

Psychology and Education : Education

Format or citation style:

APA

Pages: 2

Deadline: 7hrs

After assessing students on their progress, it is important to analyze the assessment data to help identify patterns and gaps in learning, provide meaningful feedback to students, and adjust instruction. This can be done through applying critical-thinking strategies and using higher-order questioning strategies in the classroom.

Review the “Learning Plan Template” to complete this assignment.

Complete Part 4: Questioning and Feedback, which includes addressing the following:

Provide a description of two strategies that promote questioning during instruction and how these strategies engage students and foster student independence.

Provide a description of two strategies that provide timely, meaningful, and effective feedback to students regarding their ongoing progress.

Provide two examples of digital tools and resources to promote innovation, problem solving, and creativity with the goal of increasing student engagement.

Part 2: Reflection

In 250-500 words, summarize and explain how higher-order questioning skills promote independent learning and guide students to examine their own thinking. Explain how ethics play a vital role in providing feedback and communicating assessment results to students and families. Discuss how you can use the strategies questioning and feedback in your future classroom in order to adjust instruction based on the learning needs of students.

Support your findings with a minimum of three scholarly resources.

Submit the “Learning Plan Template” with your reflection as one deliverable.

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

I have attached the Learning Plan Template, please complete part 4 within this document.

Name

Course EDU 535

Date 3/5/19

Instructor

Learning Plan Template

Contents

Part 1:  Fostering Ownership of Learning. 2

Part 2:  Learning Objectives Plan. 3

Part 3:  Learning Objectives versus Educational Goals 4

Part 4:  Assessment Plan. 6

Part 5: Questioning and Feedback.. 7

Part 1:  Fostering Ownership of Learning

Grade Level:   5   Math or ELA State Standard:  MATH
Types of InstructionStrategy Engaging Students in LearningStrategy Guiding Students to Take Ownership of Their LearningStrategy Tracking Data of Student Performance  References/Resources
Direct InstructionIdentifying the desired end result and determining the ways to go about it  Giving clear learning objectives  It is not necessary for you to track data during direct instruction. You will not have to track student performance during this part of instruction.Click here to enter text.      
Guided PracticeCreating and implementing structured practice sessions  Giving and leveraging instant feedback  Using reviews tracker sheets  Click here to enter text.  
Independent PracticePromote learning through the classroom routines  Connecting new skills and ideas to the real world  By the use of graphics displays  Click here to enter text.  

Part 2:  Learning Objectives Plan

Grade Level: 5   Math or English Language Arts Standard:  5.NBT.B.7 Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, connecting objects or drawings to strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between operations. Relate the strategy to a written form.  
Learning Objective: I can multiply and dived decimals by the power of 10  
Strategies to Communicate the Learning Objective (Collaborative Learning)
Promote open communication
Starting up group goals  
Creating a pre-test and post-test  
Strategies to Check for Understanding (Self-Directed Learning)
Identifying personal learning goals  
Understanding the personal approach to problems  
Strategies Summary It is when learning the basic skills that the building blocks for math start. When it comes to math, basic skills are applied to remember for future instructions is the use of several teaching strategies. For instance, repetition is a strategy that can be used to improve math skills. This happens by repeating and reviewing math formulas that were done previously. This way the students are able to comprehend the concepts at a bigger rate.  Another strategy is timed testing. As a teacher, when going in and about the concept of numbers, incorporating timed tests to review the previous class is important.  It helps in assessing the students understanding of the subject. Another strategy is using manipulation tools to make learning and understanding easier (The Room 241 Team, 2012). Because learning is not all about remembering the material and regurgitating it, students should be self-motivated in their quest for more knowledge.  This suggests that learning should be natural. For starters, it is important for students to understand themselves. This would include making sure that the students are engaged in learning. Evaluation is also a strategy to increase self-motivation in the students. In this case, the students should be encouraged to evaluate their efforts honestly (Digital Marketing Institute, n. d). When students are engaged in the learning process, their attention and focus increase motivating them to put into work the higher-levels of critical thinking skills. It also promotes meaningful learning experiences. Teachers who adopt the student-centered approach increase the chances for their student engagement, which in return becomes a success in achieving the learning objectives (the University of Washington, n. d). In future professional practice, I intend to make sure that my students run after activity because they want to learn and to understand and not to obtain a good grade look smart, or even please other people, or outdo other students in the class. References Digital Marketing Institute, (n. d ). How to Help Students Be Self-Directed Learners Retrieved From                                           https://digitalmarketinginstitute.com/blog/25-04-18-how-to-help-students-be-self-directed-learners The Room 241 Team, (2012). Basic Math Teaching Strategies Retrieved from                                           https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/basic-math-teaching-strategies/ The University of Washington, (n. d). Engaging Students in Learning Retrieved from                                           https://www.washington.edu/teaching/teaching-resources/engaging-students-in-learning/    



Part 3:  Learning Objectives versus Educational Goals

Grade Level: 5   Academic State Standards:  Click here to enter text.
Learning Objectives (Short-Term) Your learning objectives should be based on the long-term educational goal. These are short-term, understandable goals for the students to follow.Improving the lesson plans that provide opportunities for student growth and interaction
Personal Educational Goal (Long-Term Goal) Provide a long-term, educational goal that meets the appropriate standard for the grade level of the student.Take on courses that improve the classroom skills
Formative and Summative Assessments Develop one formative assessment and one description of a summative assessment to show how you will assess the personal educational goal. Assessment can happen before, during, and/or after instruction.Formative: monitoring a student’s learning to have progressive feedback   Summative: evaluating the students learning against some set standards
Differentiation How will you adjust instruction based on assessment results to meet the learning needs of your students?By making it interactive                                         
Reflection Learning objectives are a great way to show what to expect and what not to in the classroom. Objectives bring in the realization of a perfect description. Additionally, they will help in bettering the classroom experience for all the students.


Part 4:  Assessment Plan

Student Identified:  A. Farris Student Grade Level: 5
            Long-Term Educational Goal (from an assignment in Topic 3)          Learning Objective (from an assignment in Topic 3) 
A long term may take several weeks, months or even the whole of the course period. The aspect of teaching mathematics is shaped by the role one plays in mentorship and the development of the students. Student’s commitment to the math’s field and the course is influenced by the teacher’s enthusiasm and effort. The student is inspired through the teacher’s ability to demonstrate a belief in their abilities and providing a reliable support system to those meeting academic challenges. The students should be helped in understanding and mastering the fundamentals of math’s as this pays off both in advanced studies in math’s and for the students understanding of the world. ( Teaching Commons. 2019).      Learning objectives are identified after the overall learning outcomes have been developed. The learning objectives should be measurable and observable. These will enable the students to show a change in attitude, demonstrate specific knowledge or mastery of a skill. For a course divided into modules or units, it is prudent to have learning objectives for each module or unit. The learning objectives should be written in practical as farming them as responses. For this class, it would be framed as upon the completion of this course the students should show mastery in mathematical solving problems. These measurable objectives can be used as a basis of grading. Assessing knowledge and understanding as they form the basis of studying mathematics.  
1 Formative Assessment:  Formative assessment form an integral part in effective teaching. It helps the teacher to identify the various concepts students are struggling to grasp, difficulties in the skills they are supposed to acquire, and the learning that they have not achieved. It helps in the introduction of adjustments to be made in lessons, the techniques used for instructions and academic support. During a lesson, a teacher may pose a question to a student or a group of students to determine the specific concepts or skill that they may be having a problem with. The teacher may also use student’s work, such as journals, essays, projects, and research to relay specific, detailed and constructive feedback. This feedback may be used to revise or improve a work product. (Partnership, G. 2019) 1 Summative Assessment: It is a method of evaluation performed at the end of a unit. The teacher is able to measure a student’s understanding of standard criteria. It can be done through a written assessment where the students are tasked with a full math’s paper. Performance assessment is used also where the students are required to do an activity or a task that showcases their ability. An oral assessment is where the student is supposed to craft and deliver an oral piece. The results of this assessment are significant as they determine whether a student passes a unit. 
Summative assessment rubric: Rubrics are often formed around a set of standards and expectations. They are given to students before they begin work a particular project. It lays down guidelines on what is expected of them. It helps one to be objective when coming up a final grading for the summative assessment.
Describe the modifications necessary for summative assessment/rubric: A summative rubric should explicitly lay out the different assessment criteria. The questions should be scaled to a point where it is possible for the learning objectives to be broken into smaller pieces. It also helps the students to understand the assessment criteria and how they can provide effective and actionable feedback. (What Are Rubrics and Why Are They Important? 2019) References Defining Your Own Teaching Goals | Teaching Commons. (2019). Retrieved from https://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/resources/teaching/planning-your-approach/defining-your-own-teaching-goals Partnership, G. (2019). Formative Assessment Definition. Retrieved from https://www.edglossary.org/formative-assessment/ What Are Rubrics and Why Are They Important? (2019). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112001/chapters/What-Are-Rubrics-and-Why-Are-They-Important%C2%A2.aspx  


Part 5: Questioning and Feedback

Two strategies to promote higher-order questioning during instruction: Facilitating longer responses to questions. Through use of open ended questions the students would be required to show their level of understanding through lengthy answers. Convergent can be used where the student the answer provided measures a student’s comprehension, analysis and application of the matter in question. Evaluative questions can be used too where the students logical thinking would be used in answering on areas asked.   Engaging with the student ideas, comments, and also personal reflections Questioning provide an interactive platform for teacher and the student, this engages the students in the process of teaching and learning. The teacher should provide a background knowledge and sufficient information on the areas questioning. The question posed, the teacher would engage the students through paraphrasing the questions. The teacher engages with the student ideas through probing the responses from students and asking for clarification on the ideas. The idea relayed might be supported the teacher and also go further in extending their thinking. (Babu, R., & Arifin, S. 2017)  
How do these strategies engage students and foster student independence? It helps the students expand on ideas Through the use of questions student’s attention is grabbed. The question requires an upper thinking level. The students formulates the responses while on weighing on a variety of high level responses available. Through this the student connects the coursework and provide an in depth understanding. The process enables the students to engage with their ideas rather than relying on answers the teachers offers most of the times. (Gale, R. 2009)  
Two strategies for providing timely effective feedback to students regarding their ongoing progress: Open questions Open questions require students to offer answers in an elaborative way. Open questions method allow students to use more words to express themselves as they are not fixed. The questions used should posed in a form where it does not offer a yes or no answer as an option. Closed questions Use of closed questions involves use of questions where the answer given by the student is fixed. Questions usually posed require the students to offer meaning to words, definition to words can be also be used, questions employing multiple choices and question requiring the students to fill in the blanks. (Babu, R., & Arifin, S. 2017)    
How will you use these strategies in your future classroom? Through the use of open ended questions helps in engaging students in a discussion as it offers an avenue for debate. The questions to be used should enable the students to develop their thinking and help them to practice critical thinking skills. Questions employed should help the students to communicate their ideas and facts based on the mastery of the core concepts.  Direct questions should be employed avoiding a complex and a multilayers question. Sequence of questions should follow helping in building of complexity and depth.  
Two examples of digital tools and resources to promote innovation, problem-solving, and creativity: Timed tests Timed tests offer an avenue where student’s capabilities of critical thinking get pushed to levels where the student can think fluently. It offers a quick way for students to maneuver complicated situations. (Rahman, F., & Babu, R. 2012).   Manipulation tools Manipulative tools are physical objects used by teachers in engaging students in hand-on activities.  A concept can be introduced and practiced by the students.  
How do these strategies promote innovation, problem-solving, and creativity with the goal of increasing student engagement? Strategies employed by teachers in question incorporate active strategies where the student’s interests are sparked together with their passion. The student is motivated and engaged which in return deeper learning is developed which see to that their problem solving skills are sharpened while at the same fostering the critical thinking skills. (Rahman, F., & Babu, R. 2012).  
Reflection Use of questions while teaching increases student participation and active learning is encouraged. Keeping in mind the course objectives question well planned and laid out will enable the student to grasp and master concepts which are core. Deployed questions enable the students in practicing skill. The students are offered an arena where they can freely communicate ideas and facts. Students expresses their way of thinking during answering the questions posed by the teacher. The teacher is offered an opportunity to help and walk the students through the underlying complexities and concepts. Use of open ended questions offer an effective way of engaging students through discussions as students are offered a debating avenue. Open ended questions test a student’s responses based on very low thinking on the responding effort. Importance of this question enables teachers to gauge basic information covered already in the coursework. Question aimed on cognitive domain help the teacher in knowing how students construct responses and their understanding level. Students should be given time to formulate responses this encourages students participation. During answering time the student should not be interrupted and credit should be given where the ideas relayed show their understanding. In case the students overlooks an important matter the same student should be helped to recall, if they do not manage the question should be open for the class. The teacher would develop responses to engage the student which keep the students on the track of thinking. The whole enables the students in understanding their weak areas and would enable to put more efforts. Effective questioning fosters effective learning as this facilitates teaching-learning activities.   References Babu, R., & Arifin, S. (2017). Teachers’ Questioning Patterns Versus Learners’ Responses. Global Journal Of HUMAN-SOCIAL SCIENCE: G Linguistics & Education, 17(3), 5-8. Gale, R. (2009). Asking Questions that Matter … Asking Questions of Value. International Journal For The Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning, 3(2). doi: 10.20429/ijsotl.2009.030203 Rahman, F., & Babu, R. (2012). Classroom Questioning: An Effective Way Of Facilitating Teaching-Learning. The Dhaka University Journal Of Linguistics, 3(5), 4-7.    

#136070394

Topic:

Part 4

Type of paper:

Essay (any type)

Discipline:

Psychology and Education : Education

Format or citation style:

APA

Pages: 2

Deadline: 7hrs

After assessing students on their progress, it is important to analyze the assessment data to help identify patterns and gaps in learning, provide meaningful feedback to students, and adjust instruction. This can be done through applying critical-thinking strategies and using higher-order questioning strategies in the classroom.

Review the “Learning Plan Template” to complete this assignment.

Complete Part 4: Questioning and Feedback, which includes addressing the following:

Provide a description of two strategies that promote questioning during instruction and how these strategies engage students and foster student independence.

Provide a description of two strategies that provide timely, meaningful, and effective feedback to students regarding their ongoing progress.

Provide two examples of digital tools and resources to promote innovation, problem solving, and creativity with the goal of increasing student engagement.

Part 2: Reflection

In 250-500 words, summarize and explain how higher-order questioning skills promote independent learning and guide students to examine their own thinking. Explain how ethics play a vital role in providing feedback and communicating assessment results to students and families. Discuss how you can use the strategies questioning and feedback in your future classroom in order to adjust instruction based on the learning needs of students.

Support your findings with a minimum of three scholarly resources.

Submit the “Learning Plan Template” with your reflection as one deliverable.

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

I have attached the Learning Plan Template, please complete part 4 within this document.

Name

Course EDU 535

Date 3/5/19

Instructor

Learning Plan Template

Contents

Part 1:  Fostering Ownership of Learning. 2

Part 2:  Learning Objectives Plan. 3

Part 3:  Learning Objectives versus Educational Goals 4

Part 4:  Assessment Plan. 6

Part 5: Questioning and Feedback.. 7

Part 1:  Fostering Ownership of Learning

Grade Level:   5   Math or ELA State Standard:  MATH
Types of InstructionStrategy Engaging Students in LearningStrategy Guiding Students to Take Ownership of Their LearningStrategy Tracking Data of Student Performance  References/Resources
Direct InstructionIdentifying the desired end result and determining the ways to go about it  Giving clear learning objectives  It is not necessary for you to track data during direct instruction. You will not have to track student performance during this part of instruction.Click here to enter text.      
Guided PracticeCreating and implementing structured practice sessions  Giving and leveraging instant feedback  Using reviews tracker sheets  Click here to enter text.  
Independent PracticePromote learning through the classroom routines  Connecting new skills and ideas to the real world  By the use of graphics displays  Click here to enter text.  

Part 2:  Learning Objectives Plan

Grade Level: 5   Math or English Language Arts Standard:  5.NBT.B.7 Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, connecting objects or drawings to strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between operations. Relate the strategy to a written form.  
Learning Objective: I can multiply and dived decimals by the power of 10  
Strategies to Communicate the Learning Objective (Collaborative Learning)
Promote open communication
Starting up group goals  
Creating a pre-test and post-test  
Strategies to Check for Understanding (Self-Directed Learning)
Identifying personal learning goals  
Understanding the personal approach to problems  
Strategies Summary It is when learning the basic skills that the building blocks for math start. When it comes to math, basic skills are applied to remember for future instructions is the use of several teaching strategies. For instance, repetition is a strategy that can be used to improve math skills. This happens by repeating and reviewing math formulas that were done previously. This way the students are able to comprehend the concepts at a bigger rate.  Another strategy is timed testing. As a teacher, when going in and about the concept of numbers, incorporating timed tests to review the previous class is important.  It helps in assessing the students understanding of the subject. Another strategy is using manipulation tools to make learning and understanding easier (The Room 241 Team, 2012). Because learning is not all about remembering the material and regurgitating it, students should be self-motivated in their quest for more knowledge.  This suggests that learning should be natural. For starters, it is important for students to understand themselves. This would include making sure that the students are engaged in learning. Evaluation is also a strategy to increase self-motivation in the students. In this case, the students should be encouraged to evaluate their efforts honestly (Digital Marketing Institute, n. d). When students are engaged in the learning process, their attention and focus increase motivating them to put into work the higher-levels of critical thinking skills. It also promotes meaningful learning experiences. Teachers who adopt the student-centered approach increase the chances for their student engagement, which in return becomes a success in achieving the learning objectives (the University of Washington, n. d). In future professional practice, I intend to make sure that my students run after activity because they want to learn and to understand and not to obtain a good grade look smart, or even please other people, or outdo other students in the class. References Digital Marketing Institute, (n. d ). How to Help Students Be Self-Directed Learners Retrieved From                                           https://digitalmarketinginstitute.com/blog/25-04-18-how-to-help-students-be-self-directed-learners The Room 241 Team, (2012). Basic Math Teaching Strategies Retrieved from                                           https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/basic-math-teaching-strategies/ The University of Washington, (n. d). Engaging Students in Learning Retrieved from                                           https://www.washington.edu/teaching/teaching-resources/engaging-students-in-learning/    



Part 3:  Learning Objectives versus Educational Goals

Grade Level: 5   Academic State Standards:  Click here to enter text.
Learning Objectives (Short-Term) Your learning objectives should be based on the long-term educational goal. These are short-term, understandable goals for the students to follow.Improving the lesson plans that provide opportunities for student growth and interaction
Personal Educational Goal (Long-Term Goal) Provide a long-term, educational goal that meets the appropriate standard for the grade level of the student.Take on courses that improve the classroom skills
Formative and Summative Assessments Develop one formative assessment and one description of a summative assessment to show how you will assess the personal educational goal. Assessment can happen before, during, and/or after instruction.Formative: monitoring a student’s learning to have progressive feedback   Summative: evaluating the students learning against some set standards
Differentiation How will you adjust instruction based on assessment results to meet the learning needs of your students?By making it interactive                                         
Reflection Learning objectives are a great way to show what to expect and what not to in the classroom. Objectives bring in the realization of a perfect description. Additionally, they will help in bettering the classroom experience for all the students.


Part 4:  Assessment Plan

Student Identified:  A. Farris Student Grade Level: 5
            Long-Term Educational Goal (from an assignment in Topic 3)          Learning Objective (from an assignment in Topic 3) 
A long term may take several weeks, months or even the whole of the course period. The aspect of teaching mathematics is shaped by the role one plays in mentorship and the development of the students. Student’s commitment to the math’s field and the course is influenced by the teacher’s enthusiasm and effort. The student is inspired through the teacher’s ability to demonstrate a belief in their abilities and providing a reliable support system to those meeting academic challenges. The students should be helped in understanding and mastering the fundamentals of math’s as this pays off both in advanced studies in math’s and for the students understanding of the world. ( Teaching Commons. 2019).      Learning objectives are identified after the overall learning outcomes have been developed. The learning objectives should be measurable and observable. These will enable the students to show a change in attitude, demonstrate specific knowledge or mastery of a skill. For a course divided into modules or units, it is prudent to have learning objectives for each module or unit. The learning objectives should be written in practical as farming them as responses. For this class, it would be framed as upon the completion of this course the students should show mastery in mathematical solving problems. These measurable objectives can be used as a basis of grading. Assessing knowledge and understanding as they form the basis of studying mathematics.  
1 Formative Assessment:  Formative assessment form an integral part in effective teaching. It helps the teacher to identify the various concepts students are struggling to grasp, difficulties in the skills they are supposed to acquire, and the learning that they have not achieved. It helps in the introduction of adjustments to be made in lessons, the techniques used for instructions and academic support. During a lesson, a teacher may pose a question to a student or a group of students to determine the specific concepts or skill that they may be having a problem with. The teacher may also use student’s work, such as journals, essays, projects, and research to relay specific, detailed and constructive feedback. This feedback may be used to revise or improve a work product. (Partnership, G. 2019) 1 Summative Assessment: It is a method of evaluation performed at the end of a unit. The teacher is able to measure a student’s understanding of standard criteria. It can be done through a written assessment where the students are tasked with a full math’s paper. Performance assessment is used also where the students are required to do an activity or a task that showcases their ability. An oral assessment is where the student is supposed to craft and deliver an oral piece. The results of this assessment are significant as they determine whether a student passes a unit. 
Summative assessment rubric: Rubrics are often formed around a set of standards and expectations. They are given to students before they begin work a particular project. It lays down guidelines on what is expected of them. It helps one to be objective when coming up a final grading for the summative assessment.
Describe the modifications necessary for summative assessment/rubric: A summative rubric should explicitly lay out the different assessment criteria. The questions should be scaled to a point where it is possible for the learning objectives to be broken into smaller pieces. It also helps the students to understand the assessment criteria and how they can provide effective and actionable feedback. (What Are Rubrics and Why Are They Important? 2019) References Defining Your Own Teaching Goals | Teaching Commons. (2019). Retrieved from https://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/resources/teaching/planning-your-approach/defining-your-own-teaching-goals Partnership, G. (2019). Formative Assessment Definition. Retrieved from https://www.edglossary.org/formative-assessment/ What Are Rubrics and Why Are They Important? (2019). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112001/chapters/What-Are-Rubrics-and-Why-Are-They-Important%C2%A2.aspx  


Part 5: Questioning and Feedback

Two strategies to promote higher-order questioning during instruction: Facilitating longer responses to questions. Through use of open ended questions the students would be required to show their level of understanding through lengthy answers. Convergent can be used where the student the answer provided measures a student’s comprehension, analysis and application of the matter in question. Evaluative questions can be used too where the students logical thinking would be used in answering on areas asked.   Engaging with the student ideas, comments, and also personal reflections Questioning provide an interactive platform for teacher and the student, this engages the students in the process of teaching and learning. The teacher should provide a background knowledge and sufficient information on the areas questioning. The question posed, the teacher would engage the students through paraphrasing the questions. The teacher engages with the student ideas through probing the responses from students and asking for clarification on the ideas. The idea relayed might be supported the teacher and also go further in extending their thinking. (Babu, R., & Arifin, S. 2017)  
How do these strategies engage students and foster student independence? It helps the students expand on ideas Through the use of questions student’s attention is grabbed. The question requires an upper thinking level. The students formulates the responses while on weighing on a variety of high level responses available. Through this the student connects the coursework and provide an in depth understanding. The process enables the students to engage with their ideas rather than relying on answers the teachers offers most of the times. (Gale, R. 2009)  
Two strategies for providing timely effective feedback to students regarding their ongoing progress: Open questions Open questions require students to offer answers in an elaborative way. Open questions method allow students to use more words to express themselves as they are not fixed. The questions used should posed in a form where it does not offer a yes or no answer as an option. Closed questions Use of closed questions involves use of questions where the answer given by the student is fixed. Questions usually posed require the students to offer meaning to words, definition to words can be also be used, questions employing multiple choices and question requiring the students to fill in the blanks. (Babu, R., & Arifin, S. 2017)    
How will you use these strategies in your future classroom? Through the use of open ended questions helps in engaging students in a discussion as it offers an avenue for debate. The questions to be used should enable the students to develop their thinking and help them to practice critical thinking skills. Questions employed should help the students to communicate their ideas and facts based on the mastery of the core concepts.  Direct questions should be employed avoiding a complex and a multilayers question. Sequence of questions should follow helping in building of complexity and depth.  
Two examples of digital tools and resources to promote innovation, problem-solving, and creativity: Timed tests Timed tests offer an avenue where student’s capabilities of critical thinking get pushed to levels where the student can think fluently. It offers a quick way for students to maneuver complicated situations. (Rahman, F., & Babu, R. 2012).   Manipulation tools Manipulative tools are physical objects used by teachers in engaging students in hand-on activities.  A concept can be introduced and practiced by the students.  
How do these strategies promote innovation, problem-solving, and creativity with the goal of increasing student engagement? Strategies employed by teachers in question incorporate active strategies where the student’s interests are sparked together with their passion. The student is motivated and engaged which in return deeper learning is developed which see to that their problem solving skills are sharpened while at the same fostering the critical thinking skills. (Rahman, F., & Babu, R. 2012).  
Reflection Use of questions while teaching increases student participation and active learning is encouraged. Keeping in mind the course objectives question well planned and laid out will enable the student to grasp and master concepts which are core. Deployed questions enable the students in practicing skill. The students are offered an arena where they can freely communicate ideas and facts. Students expresses their way of thinking during answering the questions posed by the teacher. The teacher is offered an opportunity to help and walk the students through the underlying complexities and concepts. Use of open ended questions offer an effective way of engaging students through discussions as students are offered a debating avenue. Open ended questions test a student’s responses based on very low thinking on the responding effort. Importance of this question enables teachers to gauge basic information covered already in the coursework. Question aimed on cognitive domain help the teacher in knowing how students construct responses and their understanding level. Students should be given time to formulate responses this encourages students participation. During answering time the student should not be interrupted and credit should be given where the ideas relayed show their understanding. In case the students overlooks an important matter the same student should be helped to recall, if they do not manage the question should be open for the class. The teacher would develop responses to engage the student which keep the students on the track of thinking. The whole enables the students in understanding their weak areas and would enable to put more efforts. Effective questioning fosters effective learning as this facilitates teaching-learning activities.   References Babu, R., & Arifin, S. (2017). Teachers’ Questioning Patterns Versus Learners’ Responses. Global Journal Of HUMAN-SOCIAL SCIENCE: G Linguistics & Education, 17(3), 5-8. Gale, R. (2009). Asking Questions that Matter … Asking Questions of Value. International Journal For The Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning, 3(2). doi: 10.20429/ijsotl.2009.030203 Rahman, F., & Babu, R. (2012). Classroom Questioning: An Effective Way Of Facilitating Teaching-Learning. The Dhaka University Journal Of Linguistics, 3(5), 4-7.    

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